Mars vs. Earth compare

Mars has approximately half the diameter of Earth. It is less dense than Earth, having about 15% of Earth’s volume and 11% of the mass. Its surface area is only slightly less than the total area of Earth’s dry land.[7] While Mars is larger and more massive than Mercury, Mercury has a higher density. This results in the two planets having a nearly identical gravitational pull at the surface – that of Mars is stronger by less than 1%. The red-orange appearance of the Martian surface is caused by iron(III) oxide, more commonly known as hematite, or rust.[28] It can also look butterscotch,[29] and other common surface colors include golden, brown, tan, and greenish, depending on minerals.[29]

Internal structure
Like Earth, this planet has undergone differentiation, resulting in a dense, metallic core region overlaid by less dense materials.[30] Current models of the planet’s interior imply a core region about 1,794 ± 65 kilometres (1,115 ± 40 mi) in radius, consisting primarily of iron and nickel with about 16–17% sulfur.[31] This iron sulfide core is partially fluid, and it has twice the concentration of the lighter elements that exist at Earth’s core. The core is surrounded by a silicate mantle that formed many of the tectonic and volcanic features on the planet, but it now appears to be dormant. Besides silicon and oxygen, the most abundant elements in the Martian crust are iron, magnesium, aluminum, calcium, and potassium. The average thickness of the planet’s crust is about 50 km (31 mi), with a maximum thickness of 125 km (78 mi).[32] Earth’s crust, averaging 40 km (25 mi), is only one third as thick as Mars’s crust, relative to the sizes of the two planets. The InSight lander planned for 2016 will use a seismometer to better constrain the models of the interior.

Brian McBill

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